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!!> Read ➶ We Have Always Lived in the Castle ➺ Author Shirley Jackson – Webpolitics.us

We Have Always Lived in the CastleMerricat Blackwood Lives On The Family Estate With Her Sister Constance And Her Uncle Julian Not Long Ago There Were Seven Blackwoods Until A Fatal Dose Of Arsenic Found Its Way Into The Sugar Bowl One Terrible Night Acquitted Of The Murders, Constance Has Returned Home, Where Merricat Protects Her From The Curiosity And Hostility Of The Villagers Their Days Pass In Happy Isolation Until Cousin Charles Appears Only Merricat Can See The Danger, And She Must Act Swiftly To Keep Constance From His Grasp.

    10 thoughts on “!!> Read ➶ We Have Always Lived in the Castle ➺ Author Shirley Jackson – Webpolitics.us


  1. says:

    Bizarre, strange, haunting, sinister, disturbing, twisted, foreboding, suffocatingly claustrophobic, leaving you with the ever growing sense of unease What else can I say about this book to give it justice This is a chillingly terrifying story that has nothing to do with the things that go BUMP in the night No, it s the odd terror that comes when things go BUMP in the mind And the most terrifying things are those that are left unsaid, that creep up at you from behind the printed lines, just hinted at and left for your own brain to chillingly realize My name is Mary Katherine Blackwood I am eighteen years old, and I live with my sister Constance I have often thought that with any luck at all, I could have been born a werewolf, because the two middle fingers on both my hands are the same length, but I have had to be content with what I had I dislike washing myself, and dogs, and noise I like my sister Constance, and Richard Plantagenet, and Amanita phalloides, the death cup mushroom Everyone else in our family is dead Behind the events of the story is the mystery of the Blackwood family, rich New England landowners who are quite well aware of their presumed class snobbish superiority over the inhabitants of the nearby village the family which is in turn met with distrust, fear and even hatred not quite unfounded, actually You see, six years ago half of the members of the Blackwood family...


  2. says:

    This book is a masterpiece It is short and spare and written in crystal clear prose, yet so evocative that it is richer in nuance than most good novels twice its size It is so good I could kick myself for not reading it years ago, yet so mythic I am convinced I have known it always, like a tragic folktale or a chilling childhood dream And yet, for all its grimness, it is essentially a comedy darkly, transcendently, funny.The Blackwood sisters 28 year old Constance and 18 year old Mary Katharine live in a big old house on the outskirts of town They are fitfully persecuted by the locals, who are convinced one of them is a murderer their whole family with the exception of scatterbrained Uncle Julian was poisoned with arsenic six years ago Now the three survivors along with their black cat Jonas are living together in deliberate tranquility, when long lost cousin Charles arrives on their doorstep, barely concealing his interest in the lovely Constance and the Blackwood family estate.The narrative voice of Merrycat nickname for Mary Katherine is perhaps the most distinctive thing about the novel Deceptively childlike, obsessed with omens, magic words, and lucky days, Merrycat is nevertheless a clear and sharp eyed observer of the day to day events of her world Her naive shrewdness speaks to us like Huckl...


  3. says:

    What you think you know, you don tSeveral years ago, someone poisoned the sugar bowl at the last Blackwood family dinner, resulting in the death of nearly every family member Only the two sisters Merricat and Constance and their ailing uncle Julian remain on the secluded estate but they are not the same as they once were Since that fateful day, each remaining member has become slightly unhinged much to the gossiping villagers horror and delight.Merricat has a wistful, gentle insanity Constance has petrifying agoraphobia and Uncle Julian is on a loop constantly obsessing over discovering what happened during the last Blackwood dinner.Everyone in the village wonders, constantly, which one of them could have done it Then a mysterious cousin comes into town with shrouded motives and a pushy personality Merricat decides she must get rid of him before he discovers who killed the Blackwoods but how will she accomplish this with suspicious villagers crowding in at all sides and his own stubbornness to contend with Bizarre and haunting throughout the writing is beautiful and the story is riveting.I was absolutely swept into this story I absolutely loved the characters Merricat was both chilling and sweet Constance was almost scarily rigid and yet loving towards her sister Uncle Julian swung from senile to insane I couldn t tear my eyes away.I loved the way the author managed the characters All of th...


  4. says:

    You will be wondering about that sugar bowl, I imagine Is it still in use You are wondering has it been cleaned You may very well ask was it thoroughly washed This book is looney tune I m not even sure about some things that happened One of my GR friends needs to message me so we can discuss some things on this book Of course no one will read this so it s a mute point So Constance, Merricat, and Uncle Julian live in the home together with all of their land enclosed The rest of the family were killed Merricat is the only one that leaves to get groceries and books in town where she is picked on by everyone I loved her macabre thoughts of all the said people being dead She had a lot of different macabre thoughts through out the book The book was just so strange and I enjoyed that, even though it made me feel crazier than I am They had...


  5. says:

    My favorite Shirley Jackson novel A masterpiece of unreliable narration and of the eerie relationship between childishness and horror.I m now re reading this for a December group read, so I thought I d update this review as I go.A lot has already been written about the masterful opening paragraph of this book, so I ll focus instead on the opening chapter It basically involves the narrator, Merricat, walking into town to do some shopping Sounds boring It s anything but that Shirley Jackson uses this mundane task to show the intense hostility between the Blackwood family and the town, as well as to show Merricat s rather unusual character She s childish and playful I played a game when I did the shopping I thought about the children s games where the board is marked into little spaces and each player moves according to a throw of the dice The library was my start and the black rock was my goal And as she navigates this terrain full of landmines in the form of other people who taunt her and laugh at her, she can t help flashing her own hostility They saw me at once, and I thought of them rotting away and curling in pain and crying out loud I wanted them doubled up and crying on the ground in front of ...


  6. says:

    The least Charles could have done, Constance said, considering seriously, was shoot himself through the head in the driveway Have you ever tiptoed down a hall in a dark house late at night, not sure if you really heard that bump in the night That is what reading this novel was like, in all of the best ways possible Shirley Jackson is a renowned master at the macabre, the unnerving, the Gothic genre, and this work puts her talents on full display in HD Most have read The Lottery, whether forced by the classically inclined high school English teacher or for the pure love of the unusual, and here you will find the same masterful foreshadowing, biting eeriness and haunting cruelties found in a small town community As my Grandma used to say, You can always count on those ole townies to hide the most secrets, put on the most airs and turn on ya the quickest, and Jackson, once again, highlighted those small town characteristics in a manner that left hairs raised on the arms and resonance echoing at the finish of each chapter We Have Always Lived in the Castle is a novel about tw...


  7. says:

    I might be the only person in the world who thinks this book is too weird, senseless, anticlimactic and almost plotless The characters however are charismatic in their craziness It s just not my type of crazy.


  8. says:

    A.K.A Grey Gardens by William Faulkner Are these unfortunate souls dead or alive in their domestic limbo Oh, this is one delicious yarn with plenty of turns with a terror that comes to us only by the Literary Mistress of the Dark Herself, Shirl...


  9. says:

    Merricat, said Connie, would you like a cup of tea Oh, no, said Merricat, you ll poison me.Merricat, said Connie, would you like to go to sleep Down in the boneyard ten feet deep A cliche in American horror films is to include children singing a song that is seemingly innocent at first, but gnaws at the nerves with a haunting sadism We watch children, young and naive, signing and spinning in a corn field bathed by an autumn dusk the cliche works because it is an image that we welcome through our front door for it s familiar and idyllic pastoral sentimentality only to discover an intangible fear clawing out from within It s the murky pool from which the maggots of urban legends crawl forth and every town has one There is the house on the corner children dare one another to touch, the homeless man we hear bears a horrific curse, the school basement where we are told a student once hanged themselves and still roams about two of the three existed in my childhood town Often these legends are purely of the imagination, yet occasionally there is a seed of truth Shirley Jackson s We Have ...


  10. says:

    Ah Merricat, silly Merricat, I do believe I love you I m drawn to interestingly insane women, and though of course you would poison me in the end, what a maddening and mysterious time I would first have You are high on my list of literary loves At least ones I dare speak of What I found so wonderful about this novel was the consistency of Merricat s insanity Too often an author will distill the essence of insanity into the chaotic, and this is rarely a truism Insanity is often an overly demanding focus, a hitch in a character, a mannerism that has growth as a cancer Merricat who I cannot help but to picture as beautiful, with long and lustrous black silken hair despite all stated references to the contrary loves to be left alone that is, alone with her sister Constance and her Uncle Julian and she loves her superstitions Her superstitions I found charming, an...

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